Burials WW1 Hipswell 1915-1916

Chapter ONE

MARTIN

cause of death :recorded as accidental due to electric shock

MARTIN

S/8214 Private Robert Martin
11th Battalion Gordon Highlanders
Died 24th October 1915 Buried 27th October 1915 
Colburn Camp

Summary of Army Career

Robert Martin enlisted 19th December 1914, Edinburgh. Records stated that he was born Urr, Kircudbright. Address: Heathland, Wilsontown, Lanarkshire.
Aged 24 years, 30 days on enlistment. Occupation: coal miner. 5ft 73/4". 38"chest. His next of kin: William Martin, Heathland, Forth, Lanarkshire.
Robert Martin's death was recorded as accidental due to electric shock.
His half- brother, Andrew Little identified Robert's body, he stated that Robert was aged 24, a miner before he joined the army and that he knew nothing of the circumstances of Robert's death.
The inquest gave details of Robert's death: that other soldiers had wired up the door handle to an electric light switch and had Robert open the door. They said it had been an ongoing joke that had been played on various other soldiers for a number of days.

Life History

Robert Martin was born 1890, Urr, Kirkcudbright.  His parents were William Martin born 1850, Irongray, Kirkcudbright, he was a miner and Euphemia Little born 1850 Urr, Kirkcudbright.3
He had three full blood siblings: George, William and Euphemia Martin. Two half siblings: Andrew and James Little.
Robert's brother William had also been in the army. His records give his address as Heathland, Forth, Lanarkshire. Next of Kin: Euphemia Martin, mother. He had enlisted 26th June 1918. Aged 19 years and 8 months.
1911 Census William and Euphemia Martin are living at Heathland, Forth, Lanarkshire with George, William and Euphemia. They had been married 24 years and had had four children, all living.

Headstone Inscription: To Memory Ever Dear. Mrs. E. Martin, Heathland, Forth, Lanarkshire.
Remembered on Forth District War Memorial.

REID

cause of death: not known

REID
S/10006 Lance Corporal George Hendry Reid
11th Battalion Gordon Highlanders
Died 16th November 1915 Buried 19th November 1915 
Hipswell Camp
Enlisted: Aberdeen

Life History
George Hendry Reid was born 15th May 1897, Foveran, Aberdeenshire. His parents were Alexander Reid born 1868 Nigg, Aberdeenshire and Mary Abel? Born 1874, Newhills.  Alexander was a cattleman. George's siblings Alexander, born 1896, and Mary A P, born 1900.

Remembered on Stonehaven War emorial.

Headstone Inscription: Thy Will Be Done. Mr. Alex. Reid, Gallaton Cottage, Stonehaven

MORRISON 

cause of death: not known

MORRISON 
A/8837 Private John Morrison
12th Battalion The Cameronians
Died 12th December 1915 Buried 15th December 1915 
Scotton Camp
Died Harley Hill Hospital.

Summary of Army Career


No records found yet

Life History

John Morrison was born 30th January 1870, Rattray, Perthshire.9 His parents were John Morrison born 1823, Kirkmichael, died 1885, Blairgowrie and Marion McCaskill born 1835, Isle of Skye, died 1904, Rattray, Perthshire. John and Marion had married 30th May 1855 at Kirkmichael, Perthshire.10 John's occupation was a dyker.
John Morrison's siblings were: Donald James born 1856, Margaret born 1858, Alexander born 1866, Kenneth born 1873, Andrew born 1874, Christina and Annie. Most of his siblings are mentioned on Soldiers Effects records and received payment from John Morrison's estate. John received payment of a war gratuity.
1901 Scotland Census Marion Morrison is living with two of her sons Alexander and John, and two grandchildren at Westfields, Rattray, Perthshire. John's occupation is that of agricultural labourer/jute.

John Morrison is remembered on Rattray, Perthshire War Memorial.

HEPBURN

cause of death: not known

HEPBURN
1309 Lance Corporal James Hepburn
13th Battalion Highland Light Infantry
Died 3rd January 1916 Buried 7th January 1916
Hipswell Camp

Summary of Army Career

nothing found yet

Life History

Born Paisley, Scotland. Age 37 years when he died, year of birth approximately 1879.
Received war gratuity, paid to daughter Mary.
 

CLARK

cause of death not known

CLARK
17653 Private George Clark
9th Battalion Royal Scots Fusiliers
Died 6th March 1916 Buried 10th March 1916 
Hipswell Camp
Harley Hill Hospital

Born: St Quivox, Ayrshire

 

Summary of Army Career


Enlisted: Ayr

 

Summary of Life History


Residence: Maybole, Ayrshire
Died aged 41 years.
War gratuity paid to Elizabeth Clark, no relationship given.
Received British War, Victory and 1915 Star medals. Disembarkation date: 27th April 1915 France.

CONNOR

cause of death: known

CONNOR
S/20879 Private James Conner
8th Battalion Cameron Highlanders
Died 23rd March 1916 Buried 25th March 1916 
Hipswell Camp

Summary of Army Career


Enlisted Edinburgh. Residence Edinburgh.On the available army records James surname is sometimes given as Connor. 

Life History


James Conner was born in 1867, Edinburgh.20 He married Emma Locke on 27th May 1891, Edinburgh. Emma was born 1872, Colchester, she died 8th June 1954, Edinburgh. Her death was registered by one of her sons, Charles Edward Conner.
1911 Census James and Emma are living at 67 Gorgie Street, Edinburgh. His occupation is given as garden labourer. He had been married for 19 years. They had had eleven children, ten were living, Emma, Henry George, Alexander, Charles Edward, Elizabeth, James, Johann, Frederick, William and Jessie. By the time James enlisted his occupation was telephone linesman.
There are service records available for at least two of James sons. Alexander Conner; born 1894. Regimental Number: 3462 Royal Scots. He was wounded and gassed in 1918, survived the war. Charles Edward Conner; born 1897. Regimental number: 29430, Kings Own Scottish Borders. Records to be found under the names Charles Connor or Daniel Quinn.
www.edinburghs_war.ed.ac.uk/Gorgie_casualties gives details on James Conner.

Headstone Inscription: He Gave His All He Gave. Mrs Emma Conner, 67 Gorgie St, Edinburgh

HALSTEAD

cause of death: not known

HALSTEAD

22703 Private Fred Halstead
12th Battalion The Cameronians (Scots Rifles) 
Died 9th April 1916 Buried 12th April 1916 
Scotton Camp

Summary of Army Carrer


Have not managed to find army records for Fred.

Life History


Fred Halstead was born in 1884, Oldham, Lancashire.24 His parents were James Halstead born 1847, Oldham and Hannah Taylor born 1848,25 Oldham. They married in 1880.
1911 Census Fred was living at 62 Kelverton Street, Oldham with his mother and sister. 1901 Census Hannah, a widow is living with Fred and his sister Mary at Bolton Street, Oldham. 1891 Census, James, Hannah and their two children Fred and Mary are living at 129 Acre Lane, Oldham. James is a cotton spinner.
Hannah, age sixty three, a widow. Mary born 1882, a cotton weaver. Fred, an auctioneer's clerk.
James appears to have died sometime between 1891/1901 Census as  on 1901 Census Hannah is now widowed.
 

FRASER

cause of death : Phthsisis Pulmonaris, known today as Tuberculosis or TB.30

FRASER
932 Gunner Angus Fraser 
3rd/2nd Lowland Brigade Royal Field Artillery
Died 2nd May 1916 Buried 4th May 1916 
Scotton Camp
Died from Phthsisis Pulmonaris, known today as Tuberculosis or TB.30
Angus Fraser was admitted to Harley Hill Hospital, Scotton Camp on 16th April 1916, he subsequently died there on 2nd May 1916.


Summary of Army Career


Attested: Kilmarnock, Ayrshire, 14th February 1916. Age on enlistment: 24 years. 5ft 9". 34" chest. Occupation: Student.
Next of Kin: Alexander Fraser, father. Collam, Stockinish, Harris, Scotland.
Angus Fraser was not entitled to a War Gratuity as he had completed less than six months service.

Life History


Angus Fraser was born in 1892, Harris, Scotland. His parents were Alexander Fraser born 1848, Ballachulish and Marion Maclean born 1853, Duirnish, Skye.  Alexander was a Free Presbyterian Minister/missionary. It alleged that he was related to Dr David Livingstone, a Victorian missionary who explored Africa.34 Alexander and Marion married on 5th August, 1890 at Collam, Stockinish, Harris. Marion had previously been married to a Donald MacKay with whom she had had two sons, Edward and John MacKay, half- brothers to Angus.Angus also had a full blood sister called Dollina Fraser born 1896, Harris.
Alexander Fraser died 29th July 1935, Ballachulish, Scotland.
1911 Scotland Census, Alexander and Marion are living in Collam, Stockinish with Angus and Dollina. They stated that they had been married twenty years, had had two children of whom both were living. Alexander is a missionary, Marion is a merchant, Dollina is a school monitor and Angus is a school pupil teacher.

Angus Fraser is remembered on the Harris War Memorial.
He is also remembered on pentland.blogspot.co.uk

MACAULRY

cause of death: Found drowned

MACAULRY
1272 Private Alexander Forrester Macauley
6th (City of Glasgow)Battalion Territorial  Highland Light Infantry
Died 28th May 1916 Buried 31st May 1916
Scotton Camp
Found drowned.

 

Summary of Army Career


Enlisted Glasgow
Disembarked: 2nd July 1915 Balkans
Received British War, Victory and 1915 Star medals.

Life History


Alexander Macaulay was born 17th September 1886, St Rollox, Glasgow.39 His parents were George Forrester Macaulay born 1848 Longridge, Linlithgowshire and Elizabeth Miller born 1849, Ireland. They were married on 6th June 1870, Dublin. George was a plumber.
Elizabeth died 4th March 1890, Springburn, Glasgow of Pthisis/TB aged 41 years. 1891 Census George is now remarried to Susan Mary Cummins born 1868, Ireland. 1901 Census George F Macaulay and Susan are living at 6 Hopetown Terrace, Springburn, Glasgow with John Macaulay, son, born 1873 Ireland, Archibald born 1884, Glasgow, Alexander born 1886 and Jane Black, adopted daughter aged six.
George Macaulay died 28th February 1906, death was registered by son John. 42Susan Mary Macaulay remarried in 1909 to a John Spiers, they are found on 1911 Census at 91 Willfield Street, Springburn. Living with them is stepdaughter Jane Macaulay aged 16 years, she could be the adopted daughter Jane Black mentioned on 1901 Census. Also possible that she is the legatee in receipt of the war gratuity issued to Alexander Macaulay as it was left to a Jane Macaulay, widow and cannot find any trace of a marriage between Alexander and a Jane.
 

FRANKLIN

cause of death :Valvular Heart Disease, which is damage or defect to at least one of the four heart valves.

FRANKLIN
5187 Private Thomas Henry Franklin
3rd/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment Territorial Army
Died 17th May 1916 Buried 20th May 1916 
Scotton Camp
Thomas Henry Franklin was admitted to Harley Hill Hospital, Scotton Camp on 11th May 1916 where he died on 17th May 1916. He died from Valvular Heart Disease, which is damage or defect to at least one of the four heart valves.

Summary of Army Career
Attested 23rd March 1916, Canterbury. Aged 40 years and 201 days. 5ft 5". 36" chest. Occupation: labourer.
Address given: 81 St. James St, Dover.
Next of Kin: W.J. Franklin, 72 Wyndham Road, Tower Hamlets, Dover

Life History


Thomas Henry Franklin was born in 1877, Dover, Kent. Baptised 30th September, 1877, Buckland, Dover. His parents were: Benjamin Franklin, born 1837, Coventry, a painter and Mary Elizabeth Beer, born 1844, Dover. They were married 5th July, 1863, Buckland, Dover, Kent. Benjamin died 10th May 1888, Dover and Mary Elizabeth in 1910, Dover.
Thomas' siblings: William John born 1876, his Next of Kin, John born 1884, Rhoda born 1864, Catherine born 1866, Eliza Ann born 1869, Benjamin Samuel born 1874, Fanny Maria born 1880, Mary Ann born 1871, Edward born 1881, Jane born 1883.
Fanny Maria died 1884, Edward died 1884, Jane died 1884 of Scarlet Fever. Mary Ann died 1872 of smallpox.
Thomas' brother William John, his next of kin, was pensioned out of the Army with shell shock. His military details are: 149633 Gunner W J Franklin, 11 Company, Royal Garrison Artillery. He is mentioned on CWGC Headstone Inscription's for Thomas Henry, giving his name and address as Mr. W J Franklin, 72 Wyndham, Dover.
Benjamin Samuel born 7th April 1874 joined the Royal Navy, in 1901 his number 164423 Able Seaman, he died 22nd September 1914 on HMS Aboukir.
Both Thomas and Benjamin are remembered on Dover War Memorial and are part of Dover War Memorial Project:

FRANKLIN, THOMAS HENRY. 5187. Leicestershire Regiment, 3rd/5th Bn. Died: Home. 17/05/1916. Age 40. Son of Benjamin Franklin, of Dover, Kent. Born: Dover, Kent. Enlisted:  Loughborough, Leics. Residence:  Dover, Kent. Brother of Benjamin Franklin: Born Dover 1876. 1901; fire hawker (?), Ethelbert Rd., son of Mary, widow, shirt washer.

FRANKLIN, BENJAMIN, 164423. Able Seaman, Royal Navy. (RFR/CH/B/3262). H.M.S. "Aboukir." Died: 22/09/1914. Age 40. Son of Benjamin Samuel Franklin, of George St., Buckland, Dover. Husband of Kate Franklin, of 10, Ethelbert Rd. Tower Hamlets, Dover, Kent. Memorial: Chatham Naval Memorial. Ref: 2.  H.M.S. Aboukir, was hit by a single torpedo and sank 22nd Sept 1914. Born Dover 1873. 1901; Able Seaman, R.N., 6 Ethelbert Rd., son of Mary, widow, shirt washer.

Further family information: http://www.fadedgenes.co.uk/ThomasFRANKLIN

RATCLIFFE

cause of death: not known

RATCLIFFE
2153 Private Joseph Ratcliffe
5th Reserve Battalion North Staffordshire Regiment
Died 9th June 1916 Buried 15th June 1916 
Scotton Camp

Summary of Army Career

Received British War, Victory and 1915 Star medals. Disembarkation: France 3rd March 1915.

Life History


Joseph Ratcliffe was born Newcastle, Staffordshire. His parents were Robert and Elizabeth Russell, of 26 Bow Street, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffordshire.
1901 Census;  5 Windsor Street, Newcastle under Lyme, Mary Ratcliffe is living with her three children Joseph, Ernest and Annie Maria at the home of James and Mary Ann Ratcliffe. She is described as a widow, occupation potters transferer. Boarding at the house is Alfred Russell.
1911 Census 26 Bow Street, Newcastle, Staffordshire, Alfred and Elizabeth Russell and Joseph, Ernest and Annie Russell, their surname should be Ratcliffe. The census states that Alfred and Elizabeth have been married for 21 years and have had three children. They had in fact married in 1907.Joseph's occupation is a worker in a tile factory.
School records dated 1904 Hassell Street Council Girls School gave Annie's date of birth as 17th April 1897, father's name Robert and she was living at 5 Windsor Street. Her mother is already described as a widow on the 1901 Census and there is no mention on Annie's school records that Robert is deceased.

Headstone Inscription: Address acknowledgement - Mrs M. E. Russell, 26 Bond Street, Newcastle on Tyne, Staffordshire
 

CAMPBELL

cause of death: not known

CAMPBELL
4095 Private John Campbell
7th Battalion Highland Light Infantry
Died 3rd June 1916 Buried 6th June 1916 
Hipswell Camp

 

Summary of Army Career
John Campbell did not receive a war gratuity as he had completed less than six months service.

Life History


John Campbell was born 1885. His parents were Angus Campbell born 1849, Morven, Argyllshire and Agnes Thomson Wands born 1851, Cambuslang, Lanarkshire. Angus died before 1916 and Agnes died 22nd November1925, Whitefield House, Cambuslang. Angus was a joiner.  
1911 Census Angus and Agnes are living at Whitefield House, Cambuslang with daughter Janet age 33, sons James, John and George. John is aged 26 years and is a warehouseman in an umbrella warehouse. Angus and Agnes had been married 35 years, had had six children, four of whom were living. Janet would later register her mother's death in 1925.
John's brother George Wands Campbell born 1890 died 18th November 1916 on the Somme. He was with 16th Battalion, Highland Light Infantry. 2nd Lt. George Wands Campbell is buried at Frankfurt Trench British Cemetery, Beaumont-Hamel.

Cambuslang War Memorial had the plaques with all the names removed in the early nineties, but there is a list of names that were commemorated 2nd Lt. G W Campbell Highland Light Infantry is one but the only J Campbell is that of a Sapper in Royal Engineers.

Headstone Inscription for John Campbell: To Memory Dear. Mrs. A.W. Campbell, Whitefield House, Cambuslang, Lanarkshire.
Headstone inscription for George Wands Campbell: God Giveth His Beloved Sleep. Mrs A Campbell, Whitefield House, Croft Road, Cambuslang.

SMITH

cause of death: not known

SMITH
5323 Private Edwin Cecil Smith
3rd/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment
Died 10th May 1916 Buried 13th May 1916 
Scotton Camp


Summary of Army Career
Enlisted: Woking, Surrey. No further army records found.

Life History


Edwin Cecil Smith was born West Meon, Hampshire in 5th February, 1888, baptised 18th March, 1888.59 His parents were Henry William Smith born Isle of Wight, a baker and Louisa Lovell Refford, born 1871, Godalming, Surrey . They were married 1885 at Droxford, Hampshire.
On 1911 Census Edwin is living with his parents Henry and Louisa and siblings in West Meon, Petersfield, Hampshire. Edwin's occupation is assistant grocer.
Harriet is living with her parents on 1911 Census , William and Harriet Mant. They were living at 1 Terry Villas, Knaphill, Woking, the address given on available army records of Edwin.
Edwin married Harriet Mary Mant at the Parish Church of St John's, Woking on 8th April, 1912. Edwin gave his occupation as grocer. Edwin was aged 22 years and Harriet was 21 years. Their parents were Henry William Smith, baker and William Mant, a carman. Edwin and Harriet had two children: Edith B born 191365 and Raymond C born 1914.

Headstone inscription: Father in Thy Gracious Keeping Leave We Now Our Loved One Sleeping - Mrs H M Smith, Terry's Villas, Knaphill, near Woking.

Remembered on Knaphill Holy Trinity War Memorial and on westmeonpc.org.uk

HERRINGTON

cause of death : not known

HERRINGTON
3/8985 Sergeant Henry Herrington 
3rd Battalion Yorkshire Regiment (Alexandra Princess of Wales Own)
Died 22nd December 1916 Buried 24th December 1916 
Hipswell Camp

Summary of Army Career


Enlisted: Richmond, North Yorkshire
Resided: Middlesbrough
Previous army career served in India.
War Gratuity and outstanding pay was paid to widow Lily E M Herrington and children.

Life History


Henry Herrington was born in Yarpole, Herefordshire in 1867.72 His parents were Joseph Herrington born 1812, Herefordshire, he died 1892,73 and Sarah Morgan born 1828, Herefordshire.74 Joseph was a farmer. 
Henry married Lily Edith May Grubb in Leominster 1903.76 Lily was born in 1873, Leominster, Herefordshire.77 They had four daughters: Edith Kathleen born 1905, Hereford, Eva Marion born 1907, Middlesbrough, Norah born 1913, Middlesbrough, Eileen born 1911, Middlesbrough and possibly Josephine born 21st August 1917 Middlesbrough, mother's maiden name Grubb.
1911 Census Henry and Lily were living at 38 Melrose Street, Middlesbrough. Henry's occupation was watcher (army pensioner) HM Customs. Henry and Lily had been married for seven years, had had three children, two living.
After Henry's death, Lily returned to Herefordshire at some point as she died there in 1951

Remembered on Middlesbrough War Memorial.

PARKER

cause of death : not known

PARKER
SS/8052 Private Henry Parker
Royal Army Service Corps
Died 31st May 1916 Buried 2nd June 1916 
Scotton Camp


Summary of Army Career


Enlisted: London
Burial record states he was 44 years old, gives an approx. year of birth as 1872.
Soldiers Effects records state that Henry died intestate; he left in excess of £34 pounds in war gratuity and payments. An AFW5070 form was sent out though, this is the form sent to next of kin in order to update the records.
Received British War/Victory and 1915 Star. Theatre of war: Egypt 28th September 1915. Records Office requested disposal of medals on 2nd February 1922 as no next of Kin could be found.

Life History

Born: St George's in the East, Middlesex, (due to boundary changes this could now be Tower Hamlets, London).

JONES

cause of death: not known

JONES
M2/077249 Private George Jones
621st MT Coy Royal Army Service Corps 
Died 28th August 1916 Buried 31st August 1916
Scotton Camp

 

Summary of Army History


Enlisted: Liverpool
Residence: Liverpool
Medals: Victory/British War/15 Star. Embarked France 9th May 1915
Soldiers Effects records war gratuity paid to widow, Louisa M, and mother, Ann Hobrough.

Life History


George Jones was born 1883 Liverpool. His parents were George Jones born 1843, Chester and Ann Guttridge born 1854 Leicester. They were married 23rd February 1881 at St James Church, Walton on the Hill, both had been widowed.89 Ann's surname on marriage was Kelly. She remarried Arthur Hobrough on 23rd January 1901,Wallasey, Liverpool, Cheshire. On both of Ann's marriages she gives her father's name as Henry Guttridge, licensed victualler. Ann died 31st January 1922, 10 Grenville Street, Liverpool.91 Arthur died 18th January 1919, at Grenville Street, Liverpool.
1891 Census George is living with parents George Jones, a publican, mother Annie and sister Annie, age 7, at Leicester Hotel, 30 Grenville Street, Liverpool.
1911 Census George is living with Arthur Hobrough and his mother Ann in Liverpool. Arthur is a licensed victualler. Also living there is George's wife Louisa Minnie Lambert, born 1881, Lancaster. George is assisting in the bar. The census states that George and Louisa have been married for six years and have had one child that died.
 

TINKLER

cause of death : Purpura Hemorrhagica, a rare blood disorder where a low number of platelets impairs the bloods ability to clot and results in bleeding into the skin and mucus membranes and profound anaemic exhaustion. H

TINKLER
S4/039150 Private George Utting Tinkler
Royal Army Service Corps
Died 27th August 1916 Buried 30th August 1916 
Scotton Camp

 

Died from Purpura Hemorrhagica, a rare blood disorder where a low number of platelets impairs the bloods ability to clot and results in bleeding into the skin and mucus membranes and profound anaemic exhaustion. He had been admitted to hospital suffering from anaemia and bleeding from the nose. George died at 6.45pm, 27th August, 1916 at Harley Hill Military Hospital, Scotton Camp.

Summary of Army Career


George Utting Tinkler enlisted in Aldershot on 30th November 1914. He was aged 21 years and 3 months. 5ft 5 1/8", 37" chest. Occupation: butcher. Address given: Pound Road, Aylsham. Next of Kin: Mrs Tinkler, 30 Artist Row, Portland, Dorset.
George Tinkler served on the Home Front 30th November 1914-21st July 1915. Expeditionary Force France 22nd July 1915-22nd September 1915, 18th Division Supply Column, disembarked Rouen. Home Front 23rd September 1915-27th August 1916.
While in France, George was in 3rd Scots General Hospital, 23rd September 1915-28th February 1916 with Rheumatic Fever. He was then repatriated to Royal Bath Hospital, Harrogate 28th February 1916-25th April 1916 still suffering from Rheumatic Fever.
George was found by the Standing Medical Board to be fit for General Service at Scotton Camp on 13th June 1916.
George Utting Tinkler received British War Medal, Victory Medal and 1914/15 Star.
His effects were left to his mother Mary F Tinkler, brothers Thomas, Jack and Cyril and sister Winifred Pannell.

Life History


George Utting Tinkler was born 10th August 1891, at 3 Ethel Street, Wigan, Lancashire.His parents were John Utting Tinkler born 1869, Norwich and Mary Francis born 1875 Cromer, Norfolk. John Utting Tinkler married Polly Frances Gray in Wigan 1890. Polly was a nickname of Mary. John Tinkler was a baker/confectioner.
1911 Census, Mary Frances is living at 30 Artist Row, Portland with Thomas and Cyril Tinkler, sons. She stated that she had been married 17 years, had seven children, five living. George was boarding at Norwich Road, Aylsham, Norfolk, he was a stable lad.
George Tinkler is remembered on Aylsham War Memorial.

MOORE

cause of death : not known

MOORE
2806 Private James Moore
5th Reserve Battalion The Cameronians (Scots Rifles)
Died 25th September 1916 Buried 29th September 1916 
Hipswell Camp

 

Summary of Army Career


Only information  found  Paid a war gratuity.

Life History


James Moore was born in 1874, Glasgow, Lanarkshire. His parents were John Moore born 1837, Ireland and mother Fanny born 1838, Ireland. John was a gas stoker.
James had three siblings John born 1861, Ireland, Mary born 1863, Ireland, she married at St Rollox, Glasgow in 1883 to James Lynch and Annie born 1873, Glasgow, she married in Glasgow, 1899 to James McNeill. The three siblings were mentioned in the Soldiers Effects records.
1891 Census John and Fanny were living at Garngard Road, Dennistoun, Glasgow with daughter Mary Lynch, her husband James and their children.
 

MCDONALD

cause of death : not known

MCDONALD
2707 Private Alexander McDonald
(Fom an unknown unit attached to)9th Battalion Royal Scots Lothian Regiment 
Died 1st October 1916 Buried 5th October 1916 
Hipswell Camp
Died after falling from off a bicycle.
Received a war gratuity of £9 12s not paid out. AFW5070 sent on 23rd June 1919. (Actually £5 15s).
Enlisted: Manchester.
Residence: Manchester.
Born 1879 Age at death 37 years

LAWTON

cause of death: Suicide

LAWTON
T4/142368 Private John Edward Lawton
'A' Coy Royal Army Service Corps 
Died 4th November 1916 Buried 8th November 1916 
Scotton Camp


Cause of death: Suicide

Summary of Army Career


John Edward Lawton had previously served with the Army. He had enlisted on 25th January 1887 into West Yorkshire Regiment, Regimental number: 1635. Discharged  York on 18th January 1899. Occupation: cloth dresser. He gave his next of kin details as: David Lawton, 7 Provident Street, Leeds. The records state that John Edward Lawton served in the East Indies from 9th September 1887-15th November 1894.
Received British and Victory War medals.

 


Life History


John Edward Lawton was born in Leeds in 1865/66. His parents were David Lawton born, 1825, Leeds and Mary Powner born 1826, Leeds. They married in Leeds in 1850.110 David Lawton was a cloth dresser/finisher. John had seven known siblings: Charlotte Ann, Elizabeth, James, William, Joseph, David, Mary Ellen and Emma/Elizabeth.A number of his siblings, nieces and nephews received payments after his death.

ARCHER

cuse of death:not known

ARCHER
7384 Private George Archer
2nd/8th Battalion Durham Light Infantry
Died 15th December 1916 Buried 20th December 1916
Scotton Camp

Cause of death not known

Summary of Army Career


Enlisted at Halifax.
Residence: Leeds Road, Bradford.
Soldiers Effects records gave Emily's name as next of kin and stated that George had not enough service to be entitled to war gratuity.


Life History


George Archer was born 1882 in Bradford, Yorkshire. His parents were John Blackley Archer born 1845, Buntingford, Hertfordshire , a railway signalman and Maria John Epey born 1845, Colne, Huntingdonshire.  John and Maria were married in St Ives, Hertfordshire in 1865.They had had ten children, nine of them living.
George married Emily Jane Triffitt on 9th March 1906, Bradford. George was aged 23, a telegraph clerk and Emily was aged 21. They were both living at 125 Folkestone Street, Leeds Road, Bradford.117 George's father John Blackley Archer, a railway signalman and Emily's father Alfred Triffett, an engine tenter.
1911 Census George Archer aged 27 is living as a boarder at 50 Stone Street, Laisterdyke, Bradford. His profession is given as telegraph clerk, painter and sign writer, disengaged at present. He declares that he is married.
Emily is living at 80 Undercliffe Street, Bradford with Henry Bailey. She stated that she had been married 5 years and had had two children, both are still living. One of the children, Doris Archer, aged 3, is living with Emily. The other child, Lena Archer, aged 5, is at her grandparents on the night of the Census. Emily had a further two children born before George's death Elsie B Archer born 1911 and Stanley B Archer born 1916.
Emily remarries quite quickly after George's death to Henry Bailey. Her marriage to Henry Bailey took place on 27th January 1917, address given 18 Bowling Back Lane, Bradford. Emily was a widow, aged 29 years, she gave her father's name as Alfred Triffit, an engine tenter, he was a witness to the marriage.

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During the research by A1 Community Works staff and volunteers it was noted that a number of deaths were caused by cebro meningitis. Meningitis was killer epidemic that across the world during and after WW1. The epidemic spread across the military camps,the navy and hospitals. There was a realisation that due to the close proximity that soldiers were called upon to live and sleep together the disease moved quickly among the fit and the ill. The research at the time lead the medical profession to revise the space allocated between beds in huts.

 

Below are 2 links

www.longtrail.co.uk/soldiers/a-soldiers-life-1914-1918/the evacuation-chain-for-wounded-and-sick soldiers

www.1914-1918.net/hospitals_uk.htm

1916 a Report on Cerebro-Spinal Fever and its epidemia:

http://www.epsomandewellhistoryexplorer.org.uk/Meningitis.html

1916 a Report on Cerebro-Spinal Fever and its epidemia: prevalence among the civil population in England and Wales, with special reference to outbreaks in certain districts during the first six months of for the year 1915 was produced by Dr. R. J. Reece . He observed:- "The outbreak of war in the summer of 1914 brought about a redistribution of the, population. Young men of military age, joining the Colours, became grouped in camps, and troops were concentrated in various parts of England for military reasons. On the advent of winter many of the troops were billeted on the civil population. Overcrowding in barracks, in 'hutments', and in billets took place, pending such time as it became possible to make suitable arrangements for the accommodation of large bodies of troops. Cerebro-spinal fever has, been termed by competent observers abroad as a disease of children and recruits. The result of the altered conditions was keenly watched, and by the end of the year 1914 it became manifest that cerebro-spinal fever in epidemic form had to be reckoned with."

 

Brian Bouchard. © December, 2016

The disease is sporadic and seasonal (most cases occur in the first quarter of the year) and often occurs in jails, barracks and overcrowded urban centres. It is more likely to happen after a bout of flu or other event that lowers the body's resistance to infection (e.g. injury, illness, vaccination, fatigue, and stress). The inflammation may be caused by infection with viruses, bacteria, or other microorganisms, and less commonly by certain drugs.

 

Meningitis can be life-threatening because of the inflammation's proximity to the brain and spinal cord; therefore, the condition is classified as a medical emergency. In a paper published in the British Medical Journal in 1915 by the eminent Sir William Osler he says that although meningitis is not very common it has a higher death rate than any acute infection except plague and cholera and has the capacity to kill within 24 hours and describes a case where a young man died with 12 hours. As with some other diseases people can carry the organisms without suffering the disease.

 

In the UK Meningitis only became a modifiable disease in England and Wales during September 1912 so accurate figures before then are not available. The following table gives details of civil cases of meningococcal meningitis, the type caused by bacteria, in England and Wales:

In the first half of 1915 there were 2045 civil cases (468 in the London area) so about 9 times the peacetime rate [Source: Reece Report to the Local Government Board 1916].

 

During the first world war the soldiers often were forced to sleep in overcrowded huts and barracks with poor heating and ventilation. The overcrowding meant that 2 or 3 times as many men would sleep in a hut as during peace time with the space between beds reduced from 36 inches to 6 inches and some men sleeping on the floor. By the end of the war it was realised that the incidence of meningitis rapidly rose in such conditions and spacing out the beds reduced the risk. During cold conditions the men would often crowd round the only heater in a hut and men sleeping in beds close to the heater were at higher risk.

 

In the UK the military approach during WW1 to cases of suspected meningitis was to immediately isolate the patient. After full diagnosis he would be sent to an isolation hospital and his bedding and that of his neighbours burned with blankets and clothing sent for disinfection. All the men sharing the room would be isolated and kept under observation and nasal swabs taken. Only after they came back negative would the hut be pronounced infection free. The isolated men would be paraded and drilled separately to others in their unit, they could not communicate directly with the cook house, their feeding utensils scalded with boiling water and each man used his own cups and plates. All waste mater was burned and separate latrines used and checks for vermin, lice etc carried out.

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